How should journalism schools adapt?

On Monday, the Poynter Institute will hold an online chat on What Do College Journalism Students Need to Learn?

It’s especially intended to address changes in the news industry and how J-schools might best adapt.

Amy Gahran, a colleage at Poynter’s E-Media Tidbits, has made many good points about this before. She won’t be able to make the chat, but she laid a good foundation for it at her blog, Contentious.

Some possible discussion questions, mainly about nontraditional topics:
* How much do students already know, and how much does it vary, and are they appropriately challenged throughout the spectrum?
* What should all journalists learn?
* What should all mass media students learn?
* What should some journalism or mass media students know that is often lacking in the curriculum?
* Which media topics, if any, should be encouraged or required of students outside the school?
* With the increasing additions, what should be considered to be dropped or reduced, from either requirements or offerings?
* What might best help educators and their institutions carry out appropriate changes?

Here are some other related links.

BUSINESS

* Case studies by Jane Stevens
* “The Innovator’s Solution: Creating and Sustaining Successful Growth,” by Clayton M. Christensen and Michael E. Raynor
* “The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More,” by Chris Anderson (book and blog)
* Newspaper Next Blueprint for Transformation, by the the American Press Institute, Innosight and a task force
* Poynter’s Bill Mitchell on Business Models Essential to Journalism Training
* Poynter’s business model section of its Transformation Tracker
* Syllabus for Saving Journalism, by Philip Meyer
* Syllabus for Digital Media & Entrepeneurship, by Dan Gillmoor

SOCIAL AND CIVIC ASPECTS

* Meatball Wiki: “Meatball is a community of active practitioners striving to teach each other how to organize people using online tools.”
* “The E-Democracy E-Book: Democracy is Online 2.0,” by Steven Clift
* The Online Community Cookbook, Digital Edge Report, by Rich Gordon, from the Newspaper Association of American and the Digital Media Federation
* The Rise of Solutions Journalism, by Susan Benesh, Columbia Journalism Review
* Solution Journalism blog
* Syllabus for Blogging, We the Media and Virtual Communities, by Paul Jones, at the J-school of UNC-CH
* “ We the Media: Grassroots Journalism By the People, For the People,” by Dan Gillmor
* “Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything,” by Don Tapscott and Anthony D. Williams

TECHNOLOGY

* Computational journalism
- Georgia Tech – Report on conference in spring of 2008
- Duke University — job post for professor, and article and Q&A about planned program
* “Journalism 2.0: How to Survive and Thrive,” by Mark Briggs, available in book form or free online.
* Reporter’s Guide to Multimedia Proficiency, by Mindy McAdams
* Testable, Measurable Skills We Should Teach in J-School by Mindy McAdams

MISCELLANEOUS

* Basic Principles of Online Journalism, by fellow Tidbitter Paul Bradshaw
* Digital media resources from the NAA, Newspaper Association of America
* Digital media master’s degree program at the University of Washington program for master of communication
* MIT’s Center for Future Civic Media
* My outline for a college program in civic media

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4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. [...] can be found in the business section of my post about how journalism schools might best adapt to changes. Published [...]

  2. [...] More resources are listed at the bottom of my post on “How should journalism schools adapt?” Published [...]

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