Business link

Revenue Two Point Zero
(found via Poynter)
From the site:

In the manifesto we posted last week, we identified four strategies for funding journalism. These links point to demonstrations of new revenue models we developed for news companies:

Published in: on March 24, 2009 at 1:55 am  Comments (1)  
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Links about the business side of news

* INMA — International News Marketing Association

* AIMGroup — Advanced Interactive Media Group, which says, “We are experts in developing successful revenue strategies around automotive, real estate, recruitment and merchandise advertising.”

http://aimgroup.com/

More can be found in the business section of my post about how journalism schools might best adapt to changes.

Published in: on March 22, 2009 at 1:52 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Findings: further fragmentation

Dave Morgan at Online Spin suggests newspaper companies should break apart to focus on different services: local news, distribution, printing, and ads and marketing. (Found via the Future of Newspapers blog.)

My friend David Cohn has earlier suggested that newspapers become less “products” and more “services.” Somewhat related is a post from ReadWriteWeb that suggested that turn around to some extent. They would help people not just find information, but also help them be found, such as with advice on attracting an audience for their videos.

Findings: cooperation, and revenue

* At Slate, Tim Harford writes about research on whether newspaper Web sites should be free. The article is based on work by economist Matthew Gentzkow. (The PDF is about 30 pages.)

* From Robin ‘Roblimo’ Miller via Poynter’s online news mailing list, I learned of the Newspapers on Drupal group. Members are listed here. Drupal is an an open-source content management platform.

* At Common Sense Journalism, Doug Fisher suggests the news industry form a cooperative “skunk works” — described by Wikipedia as “a group within an organization given a high degree of autonomy and unhampered by bureaucracy, tasked with working on advanced or secret projects.”

Lockheed Martin had the first skunk works by that name, in the 194os in Burbank, Calif., to rapidly develop the XP-80, a new jet fighter. 

The phrase is based on the “skonk works,” or the still, in the “L’il Abner” comic strip by Al Capp.

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